Xopenex (Levosalbutamol/Levalbuterol)

Summary on Xopenex Inhaler

Xopenex Levosalbutamol Levalbuterol

Xopenex (levalbuterol HFA) is a "rescue" type asthma inhaler used to treat and prevent asthma attacks as well as bronchospasms. Xopenex inhaler is usually referred to as a "bronchodilator" - a medication that helps open the airways that were constricted due to asthma or COPD to allow more air into the lungs and thus more comfort while breathing. Xopenex, and its active ingredient levalbuterol, belong to the class of medications known as short acting beta-adrenergic receptor agonists (or simply beta-agonists for short). These medications work by relaxing soft muscles situated around the lungs and airways, which results in providing more space for air circulation. However, the downside for these medications is that they lack cumulative long term positive effects on the organism and do not actually "treat" asthma as much as suppress the symptoms. Most types of asthma therapy involve using other drugs to try and reduce the necessity of short-acting bronchodilators in the patient's everyday life.

The Necessity of Rescue Inhalers

Rescue or "reliever" asthma inhalers have become one of the absolute requirements of any type of asthma or COPD treatment. Because of their sheer effectiveness and relative lack of side effects, the use of these medications alone may be enough to keep the disease in check. Depending on your treatment regimen, you may be prescribed with different types of drugs for long-term therapy against asthma or other chronic respiratory conditions, but a fast-acting bronchodilator will almost always be among the list of required medications.

There are only several cases when a bronchodilator is not recommended to be used or overused at the very least, and they include:

  • Serious complications with the patient's liver or kidney;
  • Heart disease, heart rhythm disorder, or other heart-related problems;
  • High blood pressure, blood circulation problems;
  • Seizure disorder, such as epilepsy;
  • Diabetes.

Certain types of allergy also make Xopenex not recommended to be used. If you are allergic to levalbuterol, albuterol, or any other active or inactive ingredient within the drug, Xopenex should not be used. If you are unsure if your allergies will make this inhaler hazardous to use, you can inquire the full list of ingredients when you buy Xopenex online. You may also contact your doctor and ask any questions regarding the treatment with this asthma inhaler.

Difference of Xopenex from Similar Inhalers

Xopenex inhaler can be regarded to as a classic short acting beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, with its function and acting formula being nearly the same as in similar bronchodilators like albuterol or salbutamol. There is only one notable difference, which lies in chemistry of the active ingredient: Xopenex only contains active molecules of the albuterol formula, while the parent drug consists of both active and passive forms of albuterol molecule. The manufacturer implies that this difference provides significant reduction in the frequency of side effects as per results of their own medical study, but this claim remains speculatory as no concrete evidence has been supplied to approve of this fact. Nevertheless, Xopenex has several other minor traits - the time for the medication to "set in" is slightly lower than that of other rescue medication, arguably proving to be more advantageous when treating acute symptoms of an asthma attack. Xopenex has also a slightly reduced duration of action - usually up to 4 hours, in rare cases lasting 6 hours. The manufacturer does not directly state that this inhaler is better than the common albuterol variant, but there has been more and more recommendation to buy Xopenex online instead of other similar bronchodilators. In the end, the actual prescription of a particular drug lies in the personal choice of the doctor who composes your treatment course.